J~ CAPTIONS OF ILLUSTRATIONS

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J ENTRIES: CAPTIONS OF ILLUSTRATIONS

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JACKALFigure 1. Asiatic Jackal, Canis aureus. (Photograph © Fariborz Heidari)
JACKSON, ABRAHAM VALENTINE WILLIAMSFigure 1. Portrait of A. V. Williams Jackson by his friend (Bakhmeteff, p. 180), the artist William J. Whittemore (1860-1955). Courtesy of the Center for Iranian Studies, Columbia University. The portrait is also reproduced in Jackson, 1931, and Perry, 1938.
JADE ii. Pre-Islamic Iranian JadesPlate I. Figurine of a couchant hound bitch. Jade, highly translucent, zoned light russet to yellowish off-white: 9.0 x17.7 × 6.7 cm, wt. 1200.0 gm. Probably Samarqand (from Samarqand according to a previous owner), 4th-3rd century B.C.E. Al-Sabah Collection, Kuwait, LNS 654 HS.
JADE ii. Pre-Islamic Iranian JadesPlate V. Large platter with flattish rim and ring foot. Jade, middle green with blackish veins and patches: ht. 6.5, diam. 41.0 cm, wt. 4200.0 gm. Probably Samarqand (no putative origin available), 10th century. Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland, Ohio, USA, inv. no. 1976.73, reproduced by permission. Publ.: Lee, fig. 163; Markel, fig. 1.
JADE iii. Jade Carving, 4th century B.C.E to 15th century C.E.Plate I. Figurine of a couchant hound bitch. Jade, highly translucent, zoned light russet to yellowish off-white: 9.0 x17.7 × 6.7 cm, wt. 1200.0 gm. Probably Samarqand (from Samarqand according to a previous owner), 4th-3rd century B.C.E. Al-Sabah Collection, Kuwait, LNS 654 HS.
JADE iii. Jade Carving, 4th century B.C.E to 15th century C.E.Plate II. Figurine of a rolling mare. Hard and tough jade simulant (unidentified), slightly off-white with minor areas more grayish and translucent, some small areas of iron stain, but all the brown, tan and black consists of surface accretions: 8.0 × 14.8 × 9.2 cm, wt. 1230.0 gm. Central Asia, perhaps Ferghana or Khotan (from Khotan according to a previous owner), probably 2nd-1st century B.C.E. Al-Sabah Collection, Kuwait, LNS 816 HS.
JADE iii. Jade Carving, 4th century B.C.E to 15th century C.E.Plate III. Figurine of a helmeted man riding a lion. Jade, translucent, light grayish green with a darker area at the back: 4.9 × 5.0 × 2.3 cm, wt. 71.8 gm. Oxus region (from Balkh according to an associate of a previous owner), ca. 7th-8th century C.E. Al-Sabah Collection, Kuwait, LNS 3988 J.
JADE iii. Jade Carving, 4th century B.C.E to 15th century C.E.Plate IV. Bowl with everted lip and ring foot. Jade, white with greenish undertones, of variegated translucency: ht. 6.5, diam. 16.0 cm, wt. 196.6 gm. Probably Samarqand (from Central Asia according to a previous owner), probably 9th century. Al-Sabah Collection, Kuwait, LNS 721 HS.
JADE iii. Jade Carving, 4th century B.C.E to 15th century C.E.Plate V. Large platter with flattish rim and ring foot. Jade, middle green with blackish veins and patches: ht. 6.5, diam. 41.0 cm, wt. 4200.0 gm. Probably Samarqand (no putative origin available), 10th century. Cleveland Museum of Art, Cleveland, Ohio, USA, inv. no. 1976.73, reproduced by permission. Publ.: Lee, fig. 163; Markel, fig. 1.
JADE iii. Jade Carving, 4th century B.C.E to 15th century C.E.Plate VI. Hololithic finger seal-ring, fragmentary. Jade, translucent white, with four “claws,” double-line of mirror-reversed nasḵ inscription reading “Moḥammad b. ʿAbd-al-ʿAziz”: 3.0 × 2.2 × 1.1 cm, wt. 6.5 gm. Probably northern Afghanistan (from Herat according to a previous owner), ca. 11th century. Al-Sabah Collection, Kuwait, LNS 2698 J.
JADE iii. Jade Carving, 4th century B.C.E to 15th century C.E.Plate VII. Belt fitting. Jade, translucent, pale grayish green, diagonal connecting holes in the back for attachment: 3.0 × 2.9 × 0.8 cm, wt. 7.8 gm. Probably Balkh region (from Balkh according to a previous owner), 13th-14th century. Al-Sabah Collection, Kuwait, LNS 377 HS.
JADE iii. Jade Carving, 4th century B.C.E to 15th century C.E.PPLATE VIII. Hemispherical vessel with solid, slightly splayed foot. Jade, waxy middle green with blackish areas and vuggy voids, inlaid with gold, though only seven tiny preserved segments have been observed: ht. 5.1, diam. 7.7 cm, wt. 232.5 gm. Eastern Iranian world, perhaps Ghazni (no putative origin available), 12th century. Al-Sabah Collection, Kuwait, LNS 249 HS.
JADE iii. Jade Carving, 4th century B.C.E to 15th century C.E.Plate IX. Squat jug with handle and ring foot. Jade, variegated darkish green, inlaid with gold: ht. 9.2, max. w. 10.9, diam. belly 10.2 cm, wt. 489.2 gm. Probably Samarqand (no putative origin available), late 13th-3rd quarter 14th century, Freer Gallery of Art, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C., Purchase, inv. no. F1955.7, reproduced by permission. Publ.: Atil, 1973, no. 25; Skelton, 1978, fig. 3.
JADE iii. Jade Carving, 4th century B.C.E to 15th century C.E.Plate X. Pendant. Jade, translucent, darkish middle green, inlaid with gold, nasḵ inscription of Qur’ān 68:51-52: 6.4 × 7.9 × 0.3 cm, wt. 35.0 gm. East Iranian world (no putative origin available), dated 868/1463-64. Al-Sabah Collection, Kuwait, LNS 205 HS. Publ.: Christie’s London, 19 October 1993, lot 355. Exhibited: Treasury of the World, suppl. material to sec. 2, no. S2.2.
JADE iii. Jade Carving, 4th century B.C.E to 15th century C.E.Plate XI. Belt fitting. Jade, highly translucent, pure white with no hint of undertones of other colors, diagonal connecting holes in the back for attachment: 5.7 × 6.5 ×1.3 cm, wt. 63.0 gm. Probably Balkh region (from Dawlatābād-e Balkh, according to a previous owner, purchased in Peshawar), 2nd half of 14th-early 15th century. Private Collection, Kuwait.
JAIPURPlate I. Govinda Deva Temple, ca. 1730. Courtesy of Sawai Pratap Singh, Jaipur.
JAIPURPlate II. Hawa Mahal, 1799. Courtesy of Sawai Pratap Singh, Jaipur.
JAIPURPlate III. Jantar Mantar Observatory, 1728-34. Courtesy of Sawai Pratap Singh, Jaipur.
JALĀL-AL-DIN MIRZĀFigure 1. Hušang (Hōšang), mythical father of the Iranians and founder of the Pišdādiān dynasty. After Nāma-ye ḵosrovān, ed. Vienna, 1880, p. 26.
JALĀL-AL-DIN MIRZĀFigure 2. Jamšid, mythical king of Iran, believed to be the father of human civilization. After Nāma-ye ḵosrovān, ed. Vienna, 1880, p. 60.
JALĀL-AL-DIN MIRZĀFigure 3. Ardašir Bābakān, the founder of the Sasanian dynasty. After Nāma-ye ḵosrovān, ed. Vienna, 1880, p. 210.
JALĀL-AL-DIN MIRZĀFigure 4. Ḵosro I Anušaravān, the last great Sasanian king. After Nāma-ye ḵosrovān, ed. Vienna, 1880, p. 325.
JALĀL-AL-DIN MIRZĀFigure 5. Jalāl-al-Din Mirzā. After Nāma-ye ḵosrovān, ed. Vienna, 1880, p. 2.
JALĀYER, ESMĀʿIL KHANFigure 1. Portrait of Nur-ʿAli Šāh. Courtesy of the Decorative Arts Museum, Tehran.
JALĀYER, ESMĀʿIL KHANFigure 2. Abraham sacrificing his son. Courtesy of the Decorative Arts Museum, Tehran.
JĀM MINARETPlate I. Minaret of Jām, view from the east showing distinctive arched panel on the eastern face. Courtesy of MJAP, 2005.
JĀM MINARETPlate II. Minaret of Jam, detail of epigraphic bands on lower section. Courtesy of MJAP, 2003.
JAMALZADEH, MOHAMMAD-ALIFigure 1. Mohammad-Ali Jamalzadeh.
JĀMĀSP ii. CoinageFigure 1. Coin types of Jāmāsp and Kāwād. Group 1-1: obverse types of Jāmāsp. Group 1-2: reverse types of Jāmāsp. Group 1-3: obverse types of Kāwād. Group 1-4: reverse types of Kāwād. (Source: Schindel, 2004.)
JĀMĀSP ii. CoinagePlate I. Coins of Jāmāsp. (RY = regnal year.) a. AR-Drachm, type Ia/1a, mint AW, RY 1. Münzkabinett, Staatliche Museen zu Berlin; Schindel 2004, no. 4. b. AR-Drachm, type Ib/1b, mint GW, RY 3. Numismatic Central Card File, Institute for Numismatics and Monetary History, University of Vienna; Schindel 2004, no. A11.
JĀMĀSPASA, Dastur JAMASPJI MINOCHERJIFigure 1. Dastur Jamaspji Minocherji Jāmāspasa.
JĀN MOḤAMMAD KHANFigure 1. Jān Moḥammad Khan.
JAPAN xi. Collections of Persian Art in JapanPlate I. Bowl with cut facets. Alkaline lime glass: ht. 8.5 cm. 8th century. Shōsōin, Nara.
JAPAN xi. Collections of Persian Art in JapanPlate II. Jug with handle. White glass: ht. 27.2 cm. 8th century. Shōsōin, Nara.
JAPAN xi. Collections of Persian Art in JapanPlate III. Elliptical foliate cup. Gilt bronze: lth. 19.7 cm, ht. 5.1cm. 8th century, Japan. Shōsōin, Nara.
JAPAN xi. Collections of Persian Art in JapanPlate IV. Compound twill-weave silk. Lion hunt roundel design: lth.191.3 cm, w. 70.8 cm. 8th century, Tang China (?). Shōsōin, Nara.
JAPAN xi. Collections of Persian Art in JapanPlate V(1).Tabard of a feudal lord: front. Silk with silver and gold threads: ht. 99 cm. 16th century, Kashan. Kōdaiji Temple, Kyoto.
JAPAN xi. Collections of Persian Art in JapanPlate V(2). Tabard of a feudal lord: back. Silk with silver and gold threads: ht. 99 cm. 16th century, Kashan. Kōdaiji Temple, Kyoto.
JARI, TALL-EFigure 1. Painted pottery from Tall-e Jari B. (© The University Museum, The University of Tokyo).
JAUBERT, PIERRE AMÉDÉE ÉMILIEN-PROBEFigure 1. Pierre Amédée Émilien-Probe Jaubert.
JĀVID, ʿABD-AL-AḤMADFigure 1. Photograph of ʿAbd-al-Aḥmad Jāvid. (Courtesy of Akhshid Javid)
JEJEEBHOY, JAMSETJEEFigure 1. Sir Jamsetjee Jejeebhoy.
JENJĀNPlate I. The small area of pavement and column bases in situ at the end of the 2007 excavations at Jenjān. (Photograph by the author.)
JENJĀNPlate II. The small area of pavement and one of the column bases in situ at the end of the 2007 excavations at Jenjān. (Photograph by the author.)
JENJĀNPlate III. An upturned Achaemenid column base on the surface of Jenjān. (Photograph by the author.)
JÉQUIER, GUSTAVEFigure 1. Photograph of Gustave Jéquier.
JESUITS IN SAFAVID PERSIAFigure 1. P. Avril, Voyage en divers états d’Europe e d’Asie, entreprise pour découvrir une nouveau chemin à la Chine, Paris, 1693.
JIROFT ii. Human Geography and EnvironmentFigure 1. Map of Iran. Courtesy of the author.
JIROFT ii. Human Geography and EnvironmentFigure 2. Geomorphological map of the Halil Rud valley. Courtesy of the author.
JIROFT ii. Human Geography and EnvironmentFigure 3. Figure 3. Map of the Halil Rud flood plain. Courtesy of the author.
JIROFT iv. Iconography of Chlorite ArtifactsFigure 1. Map of Iran, with Jiroft, Konār Ṣandal, and sites of the 3rd millenium BCE with chlorite vessels. Courtesy of the author.
JIROFT iv. Iconography of Chlorite ArtifactsFigure 2. Konār Ṣandal North (105) and South (106), 28 km south of Jiroft.
JIROFT iv. Iconography of Chlorite ArtifactsFigure 3. Relative scale of the types of vessels and artifacts. a and f: “gameboards”; b: small cylindrical vessels; c: “handbags”; d: high tronconical vessels; e: cups.
JIROFT iv. Iconography of Chlorite ArtifactsFigure 4. a-b: typical landscape of the Jiroft area and ornamentation of a chlorite vessel; c: candelabrum tree; d: bush; e-f: bushes and ibexes.
JIROFT iv. Iconography of Chlorite ArtifactsFigure 5. a-d: ibexes and bushes.
JIROFT iv. Iconography of Chlorite ArtifactsFigure 6. Zebus: a: details of decoration on a tronconical vessel; b: line of zebus led by a man; c-d lying zebus.
JIROFT iv. Iconography of Chlorite ArtifactsFigure 7. a-b: lions and palm trees; c: young lion and scorpion; d: fighting lionesses over the prey; e: lion and lionesses; f: zebus and lions.
JIROFT iv. Iconography of Chlorite ArtifactsFigure 8. Cheetahs fighting snakes.
JIROFT iv. Iconography of Chlorite ArtifactsFigure 9. Eagles and snakes. a: two eagles and two snakes, on a tronconical vessel; b-e: intertwined snakes.
JIROFT iv. Iconography of Chlorite ArtifactsFigure 10. Architectural motives with gates and windows, on cylindrical vessels.
JIROFT iv. Iconography of Chlorite ArtifactsFigure 11. a: mountains landscape and waters; (upper part) a man under an arch with sun and crescent moon symbols; (lower part) man seated on his heels holding zebus; b: man holding a snake; c: two men (drinking) and zebus, on a small cylindrical vassel; d: head of woman protruding from a jar, and snakes; e: man falling from a tree to the trunk of which a zebu is tied; f: man with claws and bull-man playing with cheetahs, and a scorpion in the center (on a cylindrical vessel).
JIROFT iv. Iconography of Chlorite ArtifactsFigure 12. a-c: fragments from Tepe Yahya; d: “gameboard” on supporting tablets; e: man with claws holding two snakes; f: lion-man holding down two scorpion men; h: files of scorpion-man; j: man seated on his heels playing with cheetahs.
JIROFT iv. Iconography of Chlorite ArtifactsPlate I. Cups: a-b (h 14.5 cm ; diam 11.5 cm); c (h 17.5 cm; diam 12.2 cm); d (h 14.7 cm; diam 10.7 cm); e (h 16 cm; diam 12.3 cm). Cylindrical boxes: f (h 6.5 cm); g (h 10.5 cm; diam 16.5 cm); h (h 7.4 cm; diam 11 cm).
JIROFT iv. Iconography of Chlorite ArtifactsPlate II. High tronconical vessels: a (h 14.6 cm); b (h 16 cm); c (h 27.8 cm); d (h 17.5 cm); e (h 19.7 cm). “Handbags”: f-g (w 24 cm, thks 4.8 cm); h (w 19.5 cm; h 19.4 cm, thks 4 cm); j (w 28 cm ; h 25 cm, thks 3 cm); k (w 18.5, h 18.3 cm, thks 3.2).
JIROFT iv. Iconography of Chlorite ArtifactsPlate III. Plate III. "Gameboards”: a : eagle (l 41 cm); b: eagle (l 35 cm); c: scorpion (l 28 cm); d: table on legs (l 35 cm); e: scorpion-man (27 cm).
JIROFT iv. Iconography of Chlorite ArtifactsPlate IV. Various: miniature vessels a-b: tronconical vessels, single-horned zebu (h 8.2 cm); c : buckles (h 9.3 cm); d: scorpions (h 7 cm); e: bricks and chevrons (h 5.7 cm); f: cylindrical boxes, zebus (h 5.2 cm); g: small gobular jar (h 9.4 cm); h: globular jar with buckles (h 9.4 cm); j: small globular jar with serpents (h 6.9 cm); k: globular jar with rosettes (h 7.5 cm); l: round boxes, buckles (h 6 cm); m: with mat (h 8 cm); n: small cylindrical vessel with scorpion (h 7.5 cm).
JONAS, HANSFigure 1. Photograph of Hans Jonas. Courtesy of the author.
JONES, WILLIAMFigure 1. Engraved portrait of Sir William Jones
JONGFigure 1. Folio from an anthology of Persian poetry, Iran, c. 1450. Courtesy of Bibliothèque nationale de France, Paris, ms. supp. persan 1798, fol. 73a.
JONG-E ESFAHĀNFigure 1. Covers of the first and last issues of Jong-e Esfahan.
JONG-E ESFAHĀNFigure 2. Four members of the Jong’s founders the peak of mount Soffa, south of Isfahan, 15 February 1963. From left to right: H. Golširi, M. Ḥoquqi, J. Dustḵāh, and F. Moḵtāriān. (Photograph courtesy of the author)
JORDAN, SAMUEL MARTINFigure 1. Samuel Michael Jordan.
JOSEPH iii. In Persian ArtFigure 1. Joseph thrown in the well by his brothers, by Qollar-āqāsi, dated 1325/1947, 89 × 139 cm. Courtesy of Reżā ʿAbbāsi Museum Collection, Tehran.
JOSEPH iii. In Persian ArtFigure 2. Yusuf Gives a Royal Banquet in Honor of his Marriage, Haft owrang (Seven thrones) Mashad (?), between 1556 and 1567 AH: 27 cm × 19.4 cm. Courtesy of Freer Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., 46.12, fol. 1321.
JOSEPH iii. In Persian ArtFigure 2. Yusuf in Prison. Iran, Seventeenth century, fol. 8 of a Judeo-Persian Yusof o Zolayḵā of Jami. Courtesy of Library of the Jewish Theological Seminary of America, New York, MS1496.
JUB-E GOWHARFigure 1. View of the graveyard and the Eyvān plain.
JUB-E GOWHARFigure 2. Selection of burial goods: bronze mace-head, bronze vessels, and pottery.
JUBANFigure 1. Gold cluster-like earrings embellished with rubies on each of their four sides.
JUBANFigure 2. Gold earrings with pendant golden balls.
JUBANFigure 3. Necklace with double-layered, square Figures. On the Figures are set rubies shaped like pomegranate seeds.
JUBANFigure 4. Bronze belt buckle embossed with a bird form having a human head. The craftsmanship is precise.
JUBANFigure 5. Round-based, glass goblet. The outside is fluted with the lotus flower pattern, except for a smooth, bordered band below the lip.
JUBANFigure 6. Gray clay, handled pitcher with open mouth, ovoid body, and flattened base. Two conical spouts near the base facilitated pouring. Similar pitchers were produced from clay and silver during the Sasanian period (pitchers of this type are on display in the Irān-e Bāstān museum).
JUBANFigure 7. Orange, conical, handled clay jug with a flat base and high-necked open mouth. On the side opposite the relatively thick handle is a high, straight spout. The upper half of the body is decorated with chevrons above three horizontal bands. This jug is glazed—a technique used in the Middle East from the middle of the second millennium BCE.
JUDEO-PERSIAN COMMUNITIES ii. Achaemenid PeriodFigure 1. The Cyrus Cylinder. Babylon, 539-530 BCE. Clay. Length: 22.86 cm. Copyright, The British Museum.
JUDEO-PERSIAN COMMUNITIES ii. Achaemenid PeriodFigure 2. Daniel’s tomb. Susa, After Houman Sarshar, p. 17.
JUDEO-PERSIAN COMMUNITIES ii. Achaemenid PeriodFigure 3. Esther’s tomb. Hamadan. After Houman Sarshar, 2002, p. 26.
JUDEO-PERSIAN COMMUNITIES ii. Achaemenid PeriodFigure 4. Esther’s coffer, After Eugène Flandin, as reprinted in Houman Sarshar, 2002, p. 26.
JUDEO-PERSIAN COMMUNITIES iv. Medieval to Late 18th CenturyFigure 1. Portion of a synagogue wall. Isfahan (?), possibly from the 16th century, but probably a much later imitation. Faience tile mosaic, 264.2 cm × 472.4 cm. Photography by John Parnell. Courtesy of The Jewish Museum, New York.
JUDEO-PERSIAN COMMUNITIES ix. Judeo-Persian LiteratureFigure 1. The meʿrāj of the Prophet Mohammad to the Divine Throne….” From Jāmi’s Yusof o Zolayḵā. Iran, 1853. MS 1534, page 6. Photography by Suzanne Kaufman. Courtesy of the Library of The Jewish Theological Seminary.
JUDEO-PERSIAN COMMUNITIES v. Qajar Period (1)Figure 1. Sar-e čāl: Tehran’s maḥalla. Photograph by Antoin Sevruguin. Modern gelatin silver print from glass photonegative. Tehran, c. 1880-1900. Courtesy of the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Smithsonian Institution, Myron Bement Smith Collection.
JUDEO-PERSIAN COMMUNITIES v. Qajar Period (1)Figure 2. Carpet peddler. Tehran, 1936. After Houman Sarshar, 2002, p. 142.
JUDEO-PERSIAN COMMUNITIES v. Qajar Period (1)Figure 3. Ḥakim Nur-Maḥṃud in his home, with members of his family, his patients, students, and servants. Photograph by Antoin Sevruguin. Tehran, c. 1880. Courtesy of the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery Archives, Smithsonian Institution, Myron Bement Smith Collection.
JUDEO-PERSIAN COMMUNITIES v. Qajar Period (1)Figure 4. The day the Jews received permission to build the first Alliance school in Hamadan, 1898. After Houman Sarshar, 2002, p. 218.
JUDEO-PERSIAN COMMUNITIES v. Qajar Period (1)Figure 5. Early Zionist activists in Iran. Tehran, 1919. From left: 1. Unidentified. 2. Ḥāji ‘Aziz Elqāniyān. 3. Soleymān Ḥayim. 4. Benyāmin Maššāči. 5. Unidentified. 6. Unidentified schoolteacher. 7. Soleymān Kohan-Ṣedq. 8. Loqmān Nehurāy. 9. Ḥabib Levy. 10. Sinur Yādegār. 11. Unidentified. 12. Šemuʾil Roḵsār. 13. Eliyāhu Ḵosravā. After Houman Sarshar, 2002, p. 238.
JUDEO-PERSIAN COMMUNITIES vi. The Pahlavi Era (1925-1979)Figure 1. Students, teachers, and school directors, Hamadan, 1927. After Houman Sarshar, 2002, p. 220. Courtesy of Alliance Israélite Universelle.
JUDEO-PERSIAN COMMUNITIES vi. The Pahlavi Era (1925-1979)Figure 2. Boy's school Gym class, Jewish students with school uniform and Pahlavi cap, Yazd, 1931. After Houman Sarshar, 2002, p. 216. Courtesy of Alliance Israélite Universelle.
JUDEO-PERSIAN COMMUNITIES vi. The Pahlavi Era (1925-1979)Figure 3. Girl's school celebration, Isfahan, 1936. After Houman Sarshar, 2002, p. 216. Courtesy of Alliance Israélite Universelle.
JUDEO-PERSIAN COMMUNITIES vi. The Pahlavi Era (1925-1979)Figure 4. Reza Shah visiting the students and teachers of Hamadan schools, including the Jewish boys' school students, 1936. After Houman Sarshar, 2002, p. 216. Courtesy of Alliance Israélite Universelle.
JUDEO-PERSIAN COMMUNITIES xi. Music (2)Figure 1. Musā Khan Kāši seen here playing the kamanca with his two sons Esḥāq (left) and Ḵalil (right), c. 1897. After Houman Sarshar, 2002, p. 144.
JUDEO-PERSIAN COMMUNITIES xi. Music (2)Figure 2. Musā Khan Kāši (seated) and Bālā Khan, Morteżā Khan Neydāvud's father. This portrait was taken at the Royal Photoshop when he was the żarb player in Nāṣer-al-Din Shah's court. Later he became the kamānča player of the court. After Houman Sarshar, 2002, p. 144.
JULFA i. Safavid PeriodFigure 1. Map of Isfahan and Julfa divided by the Zāyandarud. Adapted from Plan general d'Ispahan, about 1840, engraved by Ch. Bury and Boudrot (reduced, orig. size 42 × 56 cm), Coste, pl. III. Courtesy of Avery Architectural and Fine Arts Library, Columbia University in the City of New York.
JULFA i. Safavid PeriodFigure 2. Map of New Julfa, drawing based planimetry, signed Mtac'acin gcagrut'iwn yumemnē hayrenasirē (lit. imaginary drawing by a patriot), 1829. After Karapetian, figs. 1 and 4.
JULFA i. Safavid PeriodPlate I. Tombstone, carved by Varpet Grigor (d. 1602), originally in Old Julfa’s cemetery, now in Ēǰmiacin. Courtesy of the Holy See of Ēǰmiacin.
JULFA i. Safavid PeriodPlate II. New Julfa, St. Bethlehem Church, consecrated in 1628, on the left and on the right the Church of the Holy Mother of God, consecrated in 1613, 1972. Courtesy of Vazken Ghougassian.
JULFA i. Safavid PeriodPlate III. New Julfa, All Savior’s Monastery, cathedral (built 1658-64), main portal with bell-tower, westside, ca. 1990. Courtesy of Armen Haghnazarian.
JULFA i. Safavid PeriodPlate IV. Ḵᵛāja Petros Voskan-Veliǰaneancʽ, Julfan merchant, painted in Madras, India, 1737. Courtesy of All Savior’s Monastery.
JULFA i. Safavid PeriodPlate V. New Julfa, St. George’s Church, northern portal with the adoration of the magi, ca. 1975. Courtesy of All Savior’s Monastery.
JULFA i. Safavid PeriodPlate VI. Map of New Julfa, 1990s. After Ghougassian, 1998, p. 102, map 4.
JULFA i. Safavid PeriodPlate VII. New Julfa, St. Bethlehem Church, from the courtyard of the Holy Mother of God Church, 1990. Courtesy of Armen Haghnazarian.
JULFA ii. The 18th and the 19th CenturyFigure 3. Map of New Julfa, 1990s. After Ghougassian, 1998, p. 102, map 4.
JULFA ii. The 18th and the 19th CenturyPlate VIII. New Julfa, Church of the Holy Mother of God, main portal on the west side, 1990. Courtesy of Armen Haghnazarian.
JUNKER, HEINRICH FRANZ JOSEFFigure 1. Photograph of Heinrich Franz Josef Junker.
JUSTINIANFigure 1. Th. Mommsen et al., eds., Corpus Iuris Civilis. stereotype ed., vol. 1, Berlin, 1872, title page and p. 1 of the Institutiones.

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