K~ CAPTIONS OF ILLUSTRATIONS

K ENTRIES: CAPTIONS OF ILLUSTRATIONS

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KABUL ii. Historical GeographyFigure 1. Kabul, with the basin of the Kabul river. 1. Water System. 2. Urban sites and pre-Islamic ruins. 3. Buddhist and Hindu remains. 4. Present settlements. 5. Roads. 6. Surface irrigation. 7. Major ridgelines in the Kabul river basin. Adapted from Hahn, 1964, p. 14. Courtesy of the author.
KABUL ii. Historical GeographyFigure 2. Kabul, gate of the bazaar, 1839-40, lithograph. After James Atkinson, Sketches in Affghanistan, London, 1842; repr., The London Illustrated News 73/2054, 9 November 1878, p. 433. Courtesy of Butler Library, Columbia Library in the City of New York.
KABUL ii. Historical GeographyFigure 3. Kabul, 1916. After Niedermayer; repr. and corrected, Hahn, 1964, p. 24. Courtesy of the author. Courtesy of Butler Library, Columbia Library in the City of New York.
KABUL ii. Historical GeographyFigure 4. Afghanistan, urban infrastructure, ca. 1968. A. Hospital beds. B. Telephone networks. C. Air traffic in 1967. After de Planhol, 1993, p. 663, fig. 53. Courtesy of the author.
KABUL ii. Historical GeographyFigure 5. Flow of communication and traffic toward Kabul. A. Postal service, ca. 1968. B. Domestic air travel, ca. 1968. C. Road travel, ca. 1968: D. Road travel, ca. 1973-74. After de Planhol, 1993, p. 665, fig. 54. Courtesy of the author.
KABUL ii. Historical GeographyFigure 6. The origin points of Afghan migration into Kabul, 1968. 1. More than 10 percent. 2. 5 to 10 percent. 3. 2 to 5 percent. 4. Less than 1 percent. The borders between the provinces are simplified. After de Planhol, 1993, p. 669, fig. 55. Courtesy of the author.
KABUL ii. Historical GeographyFigure 7. Kabul and environs. 1. Old City. 2. Newer quarters and suburban villages. 3. Larger industrial zones. 4. Farmlands and gardens, mostly irrigated. 5. Cemeteries. 6. Seasonally flooded wetlands. 7. Lake. 8. Main roads, paved. 9. Back roads, in part paved. B. Bālā Ḥesār. M. Military buildings. P. Palace (Arg). SN Šahr-e Naw. U. University. After Grötzbach, 1990, pp. 196-97, map 24.
KABUL ii. Historical GeographyFigure 8. Kabul, projected land use according to the city's development plan of 1971. 1. Trade, Service industry. 2. Administration, education. 3. Industry, manufacturing. 4. Residentiai areas. 5. Open spaces and parks. 6. City limits, mostly overbuilt in 1973. After Grötzbach, 1979, p. 55, map 4.
KABUL v. Monuments Of Kabul CityFigure l. Ground plan of Bālā Heṣār, Kabul. Adapted from W. Ball, Archeological Gazetteer of Afghanistan II, Paris, 1982, 35-1. Courtesy of the author. © 1982, all rights reserved.
KABUL v. Monuments Of Kabul CityPlate I. The Bālā Ḥeṣār, Kabul, southeast walls, showing the walls and bastions of the Bālā Ḥeṣār-e Pāʾin and Bālā Ḥeṣār-e Bālā and its ruined gate (Darvāza-ye Kāši). © J. L. Lee, 1978, all rights reserved.
KABUL v. Monuments Of Kabul CityPlate II. The Bāḡ-e Bābor, Kabul: Šāh Jahān's marble mosque and victory inscription, April 2006, following repair and the rehabilitation of the grounds by the Agha Khan Trust for Culture. © J. L. Lee, 2006, all rights reserved.
KABUL v. Monuments Of Kabul CityPlate III. The mausoleum of Amir ʿAbd-al-Raḥmān Khan, Bāg-e Zarnegār, Kabul: the ground (first) floor is the original Bostān Sarāy palace; the square second floor and dome was added between 1902 and 1905. © J. L. Lee, 2006, all rights reserved.
KABUL MUSEUMPlate I. Wooden effigies from Nurestān on display in the Ethnographic Room, Kabul Museum, ca. 1971; height of the foreground figure: 217 cm. (Photograph courtesy of Prof. William Allen, Director of the Center for Learning Technologies, Arkansas State University)
KABUL MUSEUMPlate II. One of the Begrām ivories offered for sale in London, 1998; its present whereabouts are unknown (photographer unknown).
KABUL MUSEUMPlate III. Kabul Museum, front view, 1996 (photograph by Jolyon Leslie).
KABUL MUSEUMPlate IIIa. (a) Second floor of the Kabul Museum, 1993-94 (photograph by Jolyon Leslie).
KABUL MUSEUMPlate III. (b) Office on the second floor of the Kabul Museum, 1993-94 (photograph by Jolyon Leslie).
KABUL MUSEUMPlate IV. Limestone mastiff gargoyle from Ai Khanum, bought in London and donated to the Afghanistan Museum in Exile, Bubendorf, Switzerland (photograph by C. Grissmann).
KAFIR KALAFigure 1. Kafir Kala. Plan of the city and the citadel. (Litvinskij and Solovjev, 1985b, fig. 3.)
KAFIR KALAFigure 2. General view of the citadel fortifications. (Litvinskij and Solovjev, 1985b, fig. 12.)
KAFIR KALAFigure 3. Plan of the citadel, earlier phase. (Litvinskij and Solovjev, 1985b, fig. 7.)
KAFIR KALAFigure 4. Axonometric reconstructions. A. Buildings of the citadel. B. Room 5. C. The Buddhist monastery. (Litvinskij and Solovjev, 1985b, fig. 6.)
KAFIR KALAFigure 5. Fragments of a Buddhist wall painting. (Litvinskij and Solovjev, 1985b, figs. 14-17.)
KAFTARI WAREKaftari ceramic vessels found at Tall-e Malyan.
KAFTARI WAREKaftari ceramic vessels found at Tol-e Sepid and Tol-e Nurabad.
KALĀT-E NĀDERIFigure 1. Qaṣr-e Ḵoršid (Sun Palace). The photograph is captioned: “This building is known as Nāder’s Tomb (Boqʿa-ye Nāderi), but it housed Nāder’s treasures” (ʿAbd-Allāh Qājār, Nāṣer-al-Din Shah’s photographer, 1893). After Badri Ātābāy, Fehrest-e Ālbomhā-ye Ketābḵāna-ye salṭanati, Tehran, 1976, Album 240.
ḴĀLEQI, RUḤ-ALLĀHFigure 1. Ruḥ-Allāh Ḵāleqi. Courtesy of Nušin Ḵāleqi.
KALHOR, Mirza Mohammad RezaFigure 1. Photograph of Mirza Mohammad Reza Kalhor.
KALILA WA DEMNA i. Redactions and circulationPlate i. Cropped opening page with Islamicate headpiece of Minovi’s 1st edition of Naṣr-Allāh Monši’s Kalila wa Demna, Tehran, 1964, p. 2. Orig. size 23.3 × 16.3 cm. Private collection, New York City.
KALILA WA DEMNA i. Redactions and circulationPlate ii. Cropped title page of Qarib’s 2nd edition of Naṣr-Allāh Monši’s Kalila wa Demna, Tehran, 1931, with Qarib’s personal dedication to Saʿid Nafisi (Saeed Naficy) and Nafisi’s library stamp. Orig. size 23.3 × 15.5 cm. Courtesy of Butler Library, Columbia University in the City of New York.
KALILA WA DEMNA i. Redactions and circulationPlate iii. The endpapers of Naṣr-Allāh Monši’s Kalila wa Demna, ed. Ṭabāṭabāʾi, Tehran, n.d. [1997?], show one painting (orig. 23 × 32 cm) combining scenes typically illustrated in Kalila wa Demna versions. Orig. size 24 × 17 cm. Private collection, New York City.
KALILA WA DEMNA i. Redactions and circulationPlate iv. Cropped black/white half title of Naṣr-Allāh Monši’s Kalila wa Demna, ed. Ājudāni, Los Angeles, Calif., 1993. Orig. size 23.5 × 16 cm. Courtesy of Butler Library, Columbia University in the City of New York.
KALILA WA DEMNA i. Redactions and circulationPlate v. The first two illustrated pages of Kātuziyān’s Aḵlāq-e asāsi, Tehran, 2nd printing, 1914: p. 6 shows the lion and the bull observed by the two jackals (orig. size 9.5 × 10 cm), while p. 7 shows the monkey and the carpenter (orig. size 5.5 × 6.5 cm). Lithograph, signed by Mortażā Ḥosayni Baraḡāni, with illustrations ascribed to Ḥosayn-ʿAli Khan Mosawwer. Orig. size 20 × 13.5 cm. Private collection, New York City.
KALILA WA DEMNA i. Redactions and circulationPlate vi. Borzuya presents the Indian tales at the court of Anuširvān (orig. size with frame 23 × 17.5 cm), from Ebn al-Moqaffaʿ's Kalila wa-Demna, ed. ʿAzzām, Cairo, 1980, repr. of 1941 edition. Miniature by Roman Strekalovsky, color pl. between pp. 22-23. Orig. size 27.3 × 21.8 cm. Courtesy of Butler Library, Columbia University in the City of New York.
KALILA WA DEMNA i. Redactions and circulationPlate vii. “Testament du Roi Houshenk” (Orig. size of plate 13.8 × 7.8 cm) from Ali Çelebi’s Ottoman adaptation of the frame-tale of Kalila wa Demna. Drawing by Clément-Pierre Marillier (1740-1808), engraved by Joseph de Longueil (1730-92). (caption too long)
ḴALILI, ḴALIL-ALLĀHFigure 1. Ḵalil-Allāh Ḵalili. After Divān-e Ḵalīl-Allāh Ḵalīlī, ed. Moḥammad Ebrāhīm Šariʿati, Tehran, 1999, cover page.
ḴALILI, ʿABBĀSFigure 1. ʿĀbbās Ḵalili. After ʿAbbās Ḵalili, Dar āʾina-ye tāriḵ, ed. M. Golbon, Tehran, 2001, p. 231.
ḴALḴĀLI, Sayyed ʿABD-AL-RAḤIMFigure 1. ʿAbd-al-Raḥim Ḵalḵāli.
KALURAZFigure 1. Gold cup from Kaluraz. Ohtsu et al., 2006, p. 14, fig. 6. Courtesy of the Iran Japan Joint Archaeological Expedition to Gilan.
KALURAZFigure 2. Male Figurine with seven-fold earthenware vessel (Kernos ring) from Kaluraz. Ohtsu et al., 2006, p. 13, fig. 5, no. 47. Courtesy of the Iran Japan Joint Archaeological Expedition to Gilan.
KALURAZFigure 3. Female figurine from Kaluraz. Ohtsu et al., 2006, p. 12, fig. 4, no. 46. Courtesy of the Iran Japan Joint Archaeological Expedition to Gilan.
KALURAZFigure 4. Female figurine excavated from Tappe Jalaliye. Courtesy of the Iran Japan Joint Archaeological Expedition to Gilan.
KALURAZFigure 5. Archeological sites in Gilan. Ohtsu et al., 2006, p. 50, fig. 21. Courtesy of the Iran Japan Joint Archaeological Expedition to Gilan.
KALURAZFigure 6. Sites of the Kaluraz/Tappe Jalaliye area. Ohtsu et al., 2006, p. 52, fig. 23. Courtesy of the Iran Japan Joint Archaeological Expedition to Gilan.
KALURAZFigure 7. Tappe Jalaliye, before excavation. Courtesy of the Iran Japan Joint Archaeological Expedition to Gilan.
KAMĀL-AL-MOLK, MOḤAMMAD ḠAFFĀRIFigure 1. Self portrait by Kamāl-al-Molk. Oil, 48 × 65.5cm, 1922, in the Majles Library. After Sohayli-Ḵvānsāri, p. 320.
KAMĀL-AL-MOLK, MOḤAMMAD ḠAFFĀRIFigure 2. Hall of Mirrors (Tālār-e āʾina), 1896. Oil. In the Golestān Palace Museum. After Sohayli-Ḵvānsāri, Kamāl-e honar, p. 231.
KAMĀL-AL-MOLK, MOḤAMMAD ḠAFFĀRIFigure 3. Takiya-ye Dawlat. Oil. In the Golestān Palace Museum. After Sohayli-Ḵvānsāri, Kamāl-e honar, p. 239.
KAMĀL-AL-MOLK, MOḤAMMAD ḠAFFĀRIFigure 4. Portrait of Ḥāji ʿAliqoli Khan Sardār-Asʿad Baḵtiāri. Oil, in the Majles Library Museum. After Sohayli-Ḵvānsāri, Kamāl-e honar, p. 303.
KAMĀL-AL-MOLK, MOḤAMMAD ḠAFFĀRIFigure 5. Portrait of Woṭuq-al-Dawla, 1917. Oil, 72.5 × 59.5. Malek Library Museum. Gift of Ezrat-Malek Soudavar.
KAMĀL-AL-MOLK, MOḤAMMAD ḠAFFĀRIFigure 6. Zanus Valley (Darra-ye Zānus), 1889. Oil, 102 × 75. In the Golestān Palace Museum. After Sohayli-Ḵvānsāri, Kamāl-e honar, p. 357.
KAMĀL-AL-MOLK, MOḤAMMAD ḠAFFĀRIFigure 7. Twin Falls (Ābšār Doqolu), 1885. Oil, 65.5 × 93.5. In the Golestān Palace Museum. After Sohayli-Ḵvānsāri, Kamāl-e honar, p. 253.
KAMĀL-AL-MOLK, MOḤAMMAD ḠAFFĀRIFigure 8. Geomancer (Rammāl). After Sohayli-Ḵvānsāri, Kamāl-e honar, p. 311.
KAMĀL-AL-MOLK, MOḤAMMAD ḠAFFĀRIFigure 9. Goldsmith of Baghdad and his apprentice (Zargar-e Baḡdādi va šāgerdaš), 1902. Oil, 53.5 × 43.5. In the Majles Library Museum. After Sohayli-Ḵvānsāri, Kamāl-e honar, p. 297.
KAMĀL-AL-MOLK, MOḤAMMAD ḠAFFĀRIFigure 10. Karbalā Square (Meydān-e Karbalā), 1902. Oil, 60.5 × 44.5. In the Goletān Palace Museum. After Sohayli-Ḵvānsāri, Kamāl-e honar, p. 285.
KAMĀL-AL-MOLK, MOḤAMMAD ḠAFFĀRIPlate I. Kamāl-al-Molk with his his friends and co-members of a branch of the Bidāri Lodge. After M. ʿErfān, 2/12, p. 549.
KAMĀL-AL-MOLK, MOḤAMMAD ḠAFFĀRIPlate II. Kamāl-al-Molk's business card. After Sohayli-Ḵᵛānsāri, p. 200.
KAMĀL-AL-MOLK, MOḤAMMAD ḠAFFĀRIPlate III. Kamāl-al-Molk with his students at the Academy of Fine Arts. After Sohayli-Ḵᵛānsāri, p. 80.
KAMĀNČAFigure 1. Ḡešak, drawing based on Kanz al-toḥaf illustrations. After Bineš, p. 113.
KAMĀNČAPlate I. Kamānča, played by Jalāl al-Dāwūd Širāzi, b/w photograph by Raymond Burnier, probably between 1934-38. After Caron and Safvate, pl. XVII.
KAMĀNČAPlate II. Two demons fettered, drawing on paper, 15th century, Iran or Central Asia. (orig. size 22.1 × 14.6 cm). Smithsonian Institution, Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, Purchase F1937.25.
KĀMRĀN MIRZĀFigure 1. Kāmrān Mirzā, After Bāmdād, Rejāl III, p. 155.
ḴĀNA-YE EDRISIHĀFigure 1. Cover of Ḵāna-ye Edrisihā.
ḴĀNA-YE EDRISIHĀFigure 2. Ghazaleh ‘Alizadeh (1947-1996).
KANAFFigure 1. An uprooted kenāf plant infected by Fusarium sp., the cause of root rot disease, Qarāḵayl Agricultural Experiment Station, Šāhi (Qāyem Šahr), Māzandarān, September 1965. Courtesy of the author.
KANAFFigure 2. Comparison of improved (left) and local (right) kenāf cultivars (held by the author), at age 120 days, grown side by side, Gilān, September 1965. Courtesy of the author.
KANDAHAR i. Historical Geography to 1979Figure 1. Ancient urban sites of the Kandahar region. 1. “Old Kandahar” (before 1738). 2. Nāderābād. 3. City of Aḥmad Šāh (1747). 4. Later extension. 5. Site where the Greco-Aramaic rock inscription was found. 6. Irrigated cultivation of the oasis (market and fruit gardening). 7. Rainwater cultivation (essentially cereals). 8. Rocky areas. (Courtesy of the author)
KANDAHAR i. Historical Geography to 1979Figure 2. Kandahar in the 17th century after Tavernier (Utrecht edition, 2 vols., 1712), described (II, p. 773) as follows: A. Chief citadel. B. Another citadel. C. Mountain in the direction of the next citadel. D. Governor's house. E. Housing of the officers and troops. F. The city's main square. G. The main street. H. Two causeways into the city. I. Path from the marsh to the city. L. Side road from the city to the chief citadel.
KANDAHAR i. Historical Geography to 1979Figure 3. Kandahar in 1979. (After Grötzbach, 1979, p. 145. © Dr. Ludwig Reichert Verlag, Wiesbaden)
KANDAHAR i. Historical Geography to 1979Figure 4. Commercial zones in the Old City, Kandahar. (After Wiebe, 1976, p. 138, simplified.)
KANDAHAR i. Historical Geography to 1979Figure 5. Tax assessment on shops in the Old City, Kandahar. (After Wiebe, 1976, p. 139, simplified)
KANGA, MANECK FARDOONJIFigure 1. Photograph of M. F. Kanga.
KANGAVARFigure 1: Kangavar, Plan, reconstructed south side and column detail.
KANGAVARPlate I. Kangavar, platform from northwest. Courtesy of the author.
KANGAVARPlate II. Kangavar, platform, west side. Courtesy of the author.
KANGAVARPlate III. Kangavar, south side with eastern staircase. Courtesy of the author.
KANGAVARPlate IV. Kangavar, south side. Courtesy of the author.
KANI, ḤĀJ MOLLĀ ʿALIFigure 1. Ḥāj Mollā ʿAli Kani.
KĀNUN-E PARVAREŠ-e Fekri-e Kudakān va Nowjavānān i. Establishment of KanunFigure 1. Book cover, “The little mermaid” (Doḵtarak-e daryā), tr. and illustrations Shahbanou Farah, 1967.
KĀNUN-E PARVAREŠ … iii. Book PublishingFigure 2. Book cover, Ṣamad Behrangi, “A little black fish” (Māhi-e siāh-e kučulu), illustrated by Faršid Meṯqāli, 1968.
KĀNUN-E PARVAREŠ … iii. Book PublishingFigure 3. Book cover, Mehrdād Bahār, Bastur, illustrated by Nikzād Nojumi, 1968.
KĀNUN-E PARVAREŠ … iii. Book PublishingFigure 4. Book cover, Mehdi Aḵavān Ṯāleṯ, “Once upon a time, Ferdowsi” (Āvardeand keh, Ferdowsi), illustrated by ʿAli-Akbar Ṣādeqi, 1975.
KĀNUN-E PARVAREŠ … iii. Book PublishingFigure 5. Book cover, Siāvaš Kasrāʾi, “After winter in our village” (Baʿd az zemestān dar ābādi-e mā), 1967.
KĀNUN-E PARVAREŠ … iii. Book PublishingFigure 6. Book cover, Ḡolām-Ḥosayn Ṣāʿedi, “Lost man on the beach” (Gomšode-ye labe-e daryā), 1950.
KĀNUN-E PARVAREŠ … iv. International Film FestivalsFigure 7. The 12th International Film Festival for Children and Young Adults, image design for poster, Faršid Meṯqāli, 1977.
KĀNUN-E PARVAREŠ … v. Film Production: 1970-77Figure 8. Poster, “Chess rook” (Roḵ), design by ʿA. A. Ṣādeqi, director and screenwriter, 1974.
KĀNUN-E PARVAREŠ … v. Film Production: 1970-77Figure 9. Poster, “Excursion on a bright sunny day” (Gardeš dar yek ruz-e ḵoš-e āftābi) director and screenwriter, Ḥasan Bani-Hāšemi, 1974.
KĀNUN-E PARVAREŠ … vi. Music and Sound ProductionFigure 10. Record jacket, “Folk music” (Āhanghā-ye maḥalli), vocalist, Minu Javān, 1971.
KĀNUN-E PARVAREŠ … vi. Music and Sound ProductionFigure 11. Poster, “The voice of the poet” (Ṣedā-ye šāʿer), audio tapes and video cassettes, a collection of voices of poets, prepared by Kanun in the mid-1970s.
KĀNUN-E PARVAREŠ … vi. Music and Sound ProductionFigure 12. Record jacket, “Life and works of Abu’l-Ḥasan Ṣabā,” narrator, Firuzeh Amir Moʿezz, mid-1970s.
KĀNUN-E PARVAREŠ … vi. Music and Sound ProductionFigure 13. Record jacket, “[Life and works of] Aminollah Hossein,” text, F. Moezi Moghadam; producer, Arsalānn Sāsāni, 1972.
KĀNUN-E PARVAREŠ … vii. Visual Arts Training CenterFigure 14. A scene of a play on a mobile theater. From left: ʿAli Purtāš, Afsāneh Tavakkoli, Kāmbiz Ṣamimi Mofaḵḵam, Hengāmeh Mofid, Moslem Qāsemi.
KĀNUN-E PARVAREŠ … vii. Visual Arts Training CenterFigure 15. A scene of the puppet show, “Red Riding Hood” (Šenel qermezi). From left: Soheylā Taslimi, Kāmbiz Ṣamimi Mofaḵḵam, Ardavān Mofid, Morteżā Ṭāheri (Ṭezi). Performed by the mobile theater group.
KĀNUN-E PARVAREŠ … viii. The Pioneers and PromotersFigure 16. Book cover, Aḥmad-Reżā Aḥmadi, “I have something to say that only you children would believe” (Man ḥarfi dāram keh faqat šomā baččehā bāvar mikonid), illustrated by Abbas Kiarostami, 1971.
KĀNUN-E PARVAREŠ … viii. The Pioneers and PromotersFigure 17. Poster, “Where is the friend’s home?” (Ḵāne-ye dust kojāst?), producer, screenwriter, and director, Abbas Kiarostami; cinematographer, Farhād Ṣaba, 1997.
KĀNUN-E PARVAREŠ … viii. The Pioneers and PromotersFigure 18. Book cover, F. Farjām and M.  Āzād, “Uncle Nowruz” (ʿAmu nowruz), illustrated by Faršid Meṯqāli, 1968.
KĀNUN-E PARVAREŠ … viii. The Pioneers and PromotersFigure 19. Book cover, Nimā Yušij, “An ortolan in the cage” (Tukāʾi dar qafas), illustrated by Bahman Dādḵᵛāh, 1973.
KĀNUN-E PARVAREŠ … viii. The Pioneers and PromotersFigure 2. Book cover, Ṣamad Behrangi, “A little black fish” (Māhi-e siāh-e kučulu), illustrated by Faršid Meṯqāli, 1968.
KĀNUN-E PARVAREŠ … viii. The Pioneers and PromotersFigure 20. Book cover, M.  Āzād, Zāl o Simorḡ, illustrated by Nur-al-Din Zarrinkelk, 1972.
KARAFTO CAVESFigure 1. Karafto, general view of the rock ridge. Courtesy of the author.
KARAFTO CAVESFigure 2. Karafto, Greek inscription over the door to room k. After Stein, p. 326 fig. 98.
KARAFTO CAVESFigure 3. Karafto, plan of the rock chambers by Rudolf Naumann. After von Gall, 1978, p. 92 fig. 2. Courtesy of the author.
KARAFTO CAVESFigure 4. Karafto, west wall of room k, with device for barring the door. Courtesy of the author.
KARAFTO CAVESFigure 5. Karafto, south wall of room l with outlook on the surrounding rocks. Courtesy of the author.
KARAFTO CAVESFigure 6. Karafto, ornamented window in room k. Courtesy of the author.
KARGAR, DARIUSHFigure 1. Photograph of Dariush Kargar.
KARGAR, DARIUSHFigure 2. Dariush Kargar memorial announcement, 2012.
KARGAR, DARIUSHFigure 3. Cover of the book Pāyān-e yek ʿomr by Dariush Kargar.
KARGAR, DARIUSHFigure 4. Cover of the book Ardāy-Virāf Nāma. Iranian Conceptions of the Other World by Dariush Kargar.
KARGAR, DARIUSHFigure 5. Cover of the journal Afsāne, issue 9, Spring 1373 Š./1994.
KARIM KHAN ZANDFigure 1. Portrait of Karim Khan Zand (© British Library Board, MS Or. 4938; Rieu, Persian Manuscripts, Supp., p. 262).
KĀRIZ ii. TechnologyFigure 1. Cross section and plan view of kārēz. After Beaumont, 1973, p. 24, fig. 1.
KĀRIZ ii. TechnologyFigure 2. Method of determining the gradient of a kārēz. After Goblot, 1979, pl. 3 after p. 48.
KĀRIZ ii. TechnologyPlate I. Aerial view of the aligned circular openings of the vertical shafts, used for digging underground water channels. Plain of Nishapur, 26 September 1977, color photograph by Georg Gerster. Courtesy of Maryam Sachs.
KĀRIZ ii. TechnologyPlate II. Aerial view of the aligned circular openings of the vertical shafts, used for digging underground water channels. Fars, 17 April 1976, color photograph by Georg Gerster. Courtesy of Maryam Sachs.
KĀRIZ iii. Economic and Social ContextsFigure 3. Kārēz systems in Iran. After Beaumont, 1971, p. 41 fig. 2.
KĀRIZ iii. Economic and Social ContextsFigure 4. Kārēz systems near Tehran. After Beaumont, 1973, p. 27 fig. 6.
KĀRIZ iii. Economic and Social ContextsFigure 5. Types of hydraulic engineering on the piedmont plains of Afghanistan. After Balland, 1992a, p. 111 fig. 5.
KĀRIZ iii. Economic and Social ContextsFigure 6. Long narrow strips of date palm fields irrigated by kārēz, Tidikelt, Algeria. After Kobori, 1976, pp. 44-45, fig.1.
KĀRIZ iv. Origin and DisseminationFigure 7. Sectional view of a very short underground channel, Hazārajāt, Afghanistan. After Balland and Brognetti, p. 124, fig. 1.
KARNĀPlate I. Karnā blown in battle, from Ferdowsi, Šāh-nāma. Detail of miniature ascribed to Solṭān Moḥammad (fl. 1505-50), Safavid, Tabriz, ca. 1522-24. Ink, colors, and gold on paper. After Welch, p. 138.
KARNĀPlate II. The naqqāra-ḵāna of the Imam Reżā Shrine, Mashad. Undated black and white photograph (ca. 1900), from: Sykes, p. 163, figure D.
KARUN RIVER i. Geography and HydrologyFigure 1. Average monthly discharge of the Karun, 1965-84. (Based on the data compiled at www.sage.wisc.edu by the Center for Stability and the Global Environment, Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies, University of Wisconsin-Madison)
KĀŠĀNI, Sayyed ABU’L-QĀSEMFigure 1. Sayyed Abu’l- Qāsem Kāšāni. After  Āqeli, II, p. 138.
KASHAN i. GeographyFigure 1. Map of Kashan Sub-province and adjoining areas. Adapted from several sources by EIr.
KASHAN v. Architecture (2) Historical MonumentFigure 1. Zayn-al-Din minaret, Kashan: “Minaret penché,” woodcut no. 96 after photograph, in J. Dieulafoy, La Perse, la Chaldée et la Susiane: Relation de voyage, Paris, 1887 (orig. h. 35 cm), p. 198. Courtesy of the Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Columbia University in the City of New York
KASHAN v. Architecture (2) Historical MonumentFigure 2. Solṭān ʿAṭābaḵš Mausoleum, adapted from left section of “imam zadeh (tombeau) a Kachan,” (orig. size 20 × 29 cm), by Eugène Flandin. After Flandin and Coste, Pl. xxx vii. Courtesy of Marquand Library of Art and Architecture, Princeton University (for the full context and size of the image see Figure 2 in section 1, above).
KASHAN v. Architecture (2) Historical MonumentFigure 3. Kashan, Friday Mosque: “Une rue—masdjed djouma,” woodcut no. 97. After J. Dieulafoy, La Perse, la Chaldée et la Susiane: Relation de voyage, Paris, 1887 (orig. h. 35 cm), p. 199. Courtesy of the Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Columbia University in the City of New York.
KASHAN v. Architecture (2) Historical MonumentFigure 4. ʿAbd-al-Razzāq Khan Bathhouse, interior spaces, “intérieur de ban à Kàchan,” (orig. size 28 × 40 cm), by Eugène Flandin. After Flandin and Coste, Pl. xxx viii. Courtesy of Marquand Library of Art and Architecture, Princeton University.
KASHAN v. Architecture (2) Historical MonumentFigure 5. Caravansary of Amin-al-Dawla, “Le Caravansérail Tasa,” woodcut no. 95 after photograph, in J. Dieulafoy, La Perse, la Chaldée et la Susiane: Relation de voyage, Paris, 1887 (orig. h. 35 cm), unnumbered plate between pp. 194 and 197. Courtesy of the Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Columbia University in the City of New York.
KASHAN v. Architecture (2) Historical MonumentPlate I. ʿEmādi Mosque. General view of the roofs, facing south. Courtesy of Mohsen Attarha.
KASHAN v. Architecture (2) Historical MonumentPlate II. ʿEmādi Mosque. Tri-dimensional projection. After Ganjnameh VI, p. 118.
KASHAN v. Architecture (2) Historical MonumentPlate III. ʿEmādi Mosque. Entrance edifice from outside. Courtesy of Mohsen Attarha.
KASHAN v. Architecture (2) Historical MonumentPlate IV. ʿEmādi Mosque. Entrance edifice from inside. After Ganjnameh VI, p. 118.
KASHAN v. Architecture (2) Historical MonumentPlate V. ʿEmādi Mosque. Gonbadḵāna. After Ganjnameh VI, p. 119.
KASHAN v. Architecture (2) Historical MonumentPlate VI. Friday Mosque. Courtyards, roofs, and minaret facing south. Courtesy of Mohsen Attarha.
KASHAN v. Architecture (2) Historical MonumentPlate VII. Friday Mosque. Entrance. Courtesy of Mohsen Attarha.
KASHAN v. Architecture (2) Historical MonumentPlate VIII. Solṭāni Seminary. General view of the courtyard and main buildings. Courtesy of Mohsen Attarha.
KASHAN v. Architecture (2) Historical MonumentPlate IX. Solṭāni Seminary. Entrance facing the courtyard. Courtesy of Mohsen Attarha.
KASHAN v. Architecture (2) Historical MonumentPlate X. Solṭāni Seminary. Ḥojras (dormitories). Courtesy of Mohsen Attarha.
KASHAN v. Architecture (2) Historical MonumentPlate XI.  Āqābozorg Mosque. A general view of the courtyard facing north. After Ganjnameh VI, p. 142.
KASHAN v. Architecture (2) Historical MonumentPlate XII.  Āqābozorg Mosque. Tri-dimensional projection. After Ganjnameh VI, p. 141.
KASHAN v. Architecture (2) Historical MonumentPlate XIII. Āqābozorg Mosque. Northwest Šabestān (prayer hall). After Ganjnameh VI, p. 135.
KASHAN v. Architecture (2) Historical MonumentPlate XIV.  Āqābozorg Mosque. Interior decoration of the wall. After Ganjnameh VI, p. 137.
KASHAN v. Architecture (2) Historical MonumentPlate XV.  Āqābozorg Mosque. Entrance space ceiling. After Ganjnameh VI, p. 137.
KASHAN v. Architecture (3) Traditional ArchitecturePlate I. Vaulted vestibule (hašti) of ʿAbbāsiān Mansion. After Ganjnameh I, p. 41.
KASHAN v. Architecture (3) Traditional ArchitecturePlate II. Private area with a pool (ḥawżḵāna), Eṣfahaniān Mansion. After Ganjnameh I, p. 146.
KASHAN v. Architecture (3) Traditional ArchitecturePlate III. Three-window room, Borujerdihā Mansion. After Ganjnameh I, p. 131.
KASHAN v. Architecture (4) Historic MansionsPlate I. Southern section of the Borujerdihā Mansion. After Ganjnameh I, p. 134.
KASHAN v. Architecture (4) Historic MansionsPlate II. Borujerdihā Mansion: tri-dimensional projection. After Ganjnameh I, p. 134.
KASHAN v. Architecture (4) Historic MansionsPlate III. The courtyard and southern section of the Borujerdihā Mansion. After Ganjnameh I, p. 127.
KASHAN v. Architecture (4) Historic MansionsPlate IV. Southwest corner of the Borujerdihā Mansion. After Ganjnameh I, p. 130.
KASHAN v. Architecture (4) Historic MansionsPlate V. General view of the Mortażavi Mansion. After Ganjnameh I, p. 12.
KASHAN v. Architecture (4) Historic MansionsPlate VI. Courtyard and southeastern corner of the Banikāẓemi Mansion, p. 14. After Ganjnameh I, p. 49.
KASHAN v. Architecture (4) Historic MansionsPlate VII. Courtyard and southern section of the Banikāẓemi Mansion. After Ganjnameh I, p. 122.
KASHAN v. Architecture (4) Historic MansionsPlate VIII. Banikāẓemi Mansion. Left: Southern section ivān. Right: Northwest corner. After Ganjnameh I, p. 120.
KASHAN v. Architecture (4) Historic MansionsPlate IX. Courtyard and northern section of the Banikāẓemi mansion. After Ganjnameh I, p. 119.
KASHMIR v. Persian Influence on Kashmiri ArtFigure 1. Terracotta bas relief with a horseman in Parthian posture and costume, with quiver and fluttering scarves in the Iranian style. At the base of the plaque are incised the Kharoshthi numerals 1, 4 and 10. Sri Partap Singh Museum, Srinagar (after R. C. Kak, 1933, pl. 23).
KASHMIR v. Persian Influence on Kashmiri ArtFigure 2. Srinagar, the tomb of Sultan Zayn-al-ʿĀbedin’s mother with Central Asian-style domes (after Tadgel, 1990, p. 182, pl. 208).
KASRA’I, SIAVASHFigure 1. Photograph of Siavash Kasra’i, mid-1980s. (Courtesy of Bibi Kasra’i)
KASRAVI, AḤMADFigure 1. Photograph of Aḥmad Kasravi, early 1940s. (Courtesy of Amir Kojoori)
KĀVA NEWSPAPERFigure 1. Example of the masthead of Kāva, showing the blacksmith Kāva raising the banner of revolt (the Derafš-e Kāvīān [qq.v]; issue 5/4, April 1921).
KAWĀD I ii. CoinagePlate I. Coinage of Kawād I. (RY = regnal year.) a. First reign. AR Drachm, type I/1, mint GW. Bibliothèque nationale de France, Cabinet des Médailles, Paris; Schindel, 2004, no. 25. b. Second reign. AR Drachm, type Ia/1a, mint AY, RY 11. Bibliothèque nationale de France, Cabinet des Médailles, Paris; Schindel, 2004, no. 66. c. Second reign. AR Drachm, type Ib/1a, mint NY, RY 16. Bibliothèque nationale de France, Cabinet des Médailles, Paris; (caption too long)
KAYĀNIĀN iii. Kauui Kauuāta, Kay Kawād, Kay Kobād (Qobād)Figure 1. A Qajar-period representation of Kay Qobād. After Jalāl-al-din Mirzā, 1880, p. 110.
KAYĀNIĀN v. Kauui Usan, Kay-Us, Kay KāvusFigure 2. A Qajar-period representation of Kay Qāvus. After Jalāl-al-din Mirzā, 1880, p. 115.
KAYĀNIĀN vii. Kauui Haosrauuah, Kay Husrōy, Kay ḴosrowFigure 3. A Qajar-period representation of Kay Ḵosrow. After Jalāl-al-din Mirzā, 1880, p. 127.
KĀẒEM, RASTIFigure 1. Drawing of Sayyed Kāẓem Rašti.
KĀẒEMI, ḤOSAYNFigure 1. Photograph of Ḥosayn Kāẓemi
KAZERUN i. GeographyFigure 1. Map of Kazerun Sub-Province. (Courtesy of Habib Borjian and Amirali Merati)
KĀZERUNI FAMILYFigure 1. Photograph of Moḥammad-Ḥosayn Kāzeruni (seated) and his sons (standing from left to right) Moḥammad-Bāqer, Moḥammad, Moḥammd-Jaʿfar, Maḥmud, and Moḥammad-ʿAli. (Courtesy of Mojdeh Kazerouni)
KĀZERUNI FAMILYFigure 2. Photograph: Seated, from left to right: Mirzā Zayn-al-ʿĀbedin, Prince Homāyun Mirzā Amir Arfaʿ, Āqā Mirzā ʿAbbās Neʿmat-Allāhi Ṣāber-ʿAlišāh, Ḥāj Mirzā ʿAbd-al-Ḥosayn Ḏu’l-Riāsatayn (the leader [qoṭb] of the Neʿmat-Allāhi Sufi order), Ḥāj Mirzā ʿAli-Akbar Mowāfeq-ʿAlišāh, Moḥammad-Jaʿfar Kāzeruni, and Mortażā Neʿmat-Allāhi. (Courtesy of Amir Hossein Forsat)
KÉGL, SÁNDORFigure 1. Photograph of Sándor Kégl (Courtesy of the Oriental Collection of the Library of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences)
KERIYAFigure 1. Keriya and its location between the Kunlun mountains and the Taklamakan desert. © Alain Cariou, 2008.
KERIYAFigure 2. Keriya landscape: the oasis is composed of small plots of land (alfalfa in the foreground) surrounded by a belt of tick poplar hedges. Scene of rural life at the end of winter; men clearing of the land before the first sowing (mainly wheat, cotton, and rice) and irrigation of the agricultural season. © Alain Cariou, 2008
KERMAN i. GeographyFigure 1. Map of Kerman Province: mountains, cities, and roads. (Courtesy of Habib Borjian and Amirali Merati)
KERMAN i. GeographyFigure 2. Map of Kerman Province: Sub-provinces and districts. (Courtesy of Habib Borjian and Amirali Merati)
KERMAN i. GeographyTable 1. Kerman City Temperature and Precipitation.
KERMAN i. GeographyTable 2. Major earthquakes of Kerman.
KERMAN i. GeographyTable 3. Sub-provinces of Kerman.
KERMAN i. GeographyTable 4. Coordinates and Elevations of Cities of Kerman Province.
KERMAN ii. Historical GeographyFigure 1. “Data from American Map Service Sheets H-40J, H-40I and 1956 aerial photo graphs (1:60,000). (Paul Ward English, City and Village in Iran, p. 6, fig. 2 © 1966 by the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System. Reprinted by permission of The University of Wisconsin Press).
KERMAN ii. Historical GeographyFigure 2. Data from map in Sykes, 1902, facing p. 188; other travel descriptions; and field observation (Paul Ward English, City and Village in Iran, p. 40, fig. 11 © 1966 by the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System. Reprinted by permission of The University of Wisconsin Press).
KERMAN ii. Historical GeographyFigure 3. Data from Sahab Geographical and Drafting Institute's 1960 Street Map of Kirman (c. 1:10,000); 1956 aerial photographs (1:6,000 and 1:12,500); and field observation (Paul Ward English, City and Village in Iran, p. 47, fig. 12 © 1966 by the Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System. Reprinted by permission of The University of Wisconsin Press).
KERMANSHAH i. GeographyFigure 1. Map of Kermanshah Province, sub-provinces and districts. (Courtesy of Sahab Geographic and Drafting Institute, Tehran).
KETĀBḴĀNA-YE MELLI-E TĀJIKESTĀNFigure 1. Ferdowsi Library. (Photograph by Evelin Grassi, 2007).
KETĀBḴĀNA-YE MELLI-E TĀJIKESTĀNFigure 2. Tajikistan National Library. (Photograph by Evelin Grassi, 2013).
KHACHIKIAN, SAMUELFigure 1. Photograph of Samuel Khachikian.
KHADEMI, ALI MOHAMMADFigure 1. Photograph of Ali Mohammad Khademi. Courtesy of Abbas Atrvash.
KHADEMI, ALI MOHAMMADFigure 2. Ali Mohammad Khademi with management team at Iran Air. Courtesy of Rahavard.
KHADEMI, ALI MOHAMMADFigure 3. Ali Mohammad Khademi at Northrop University.
KHAKSAR, MANSURFigure 1. Photograph of Mansur Khaksar.
KHAKSAR, MANSURFigure 2. Book cover, Va čand noqṭa-ye digar.
KHALCHAYANFigure 1. Clay head of Heraus clansman, Khalchayan. Mid-1st century BCE (Pugachenkova, 1966, No. 56).
KHALCHAYANFigure 2. Silver coin of Greco-Bactrian king, Demetrius. 2nd century BCE (Staviskij, 1986).
KHALCHAYANFigure 3. Gold plaque, Oxus Treasure. 4th century B.C.E (?) (B.M. No. 123949; Dalton, 1964, No. 48).
KHALCHAYANFigure 4. Terracotta emblemata, Ai Khanum (No. 1156). 3rd-2nd century BCE.
KHALCHAYANFigure 5. Copper trumpet, Gonur (southeastTurkmenistan, ancient Margiana, neighboring Bactria). 2nd millennium BCE (Lawergren, 2003).
KHALCHAYANFigure 6. Winged lion-gryphon, Oxus Treasure. Gold, 5th-4th century BCE (B.M. no 123924; Dalton, 1964, No. 23).
KHALKHAL ii. Basic Population DataFigure 1. Map of the distribution of population in the five traditional sub-districts of Khalkhal. (Courtesy of the author).
KHALKHAL ii. Basic Population DataFigure 2. Map of the administrative divisions of the former district of Khalkhal in 1377 Š./1998. (Courtesy of the author).
KHALKHAL ii. Basic Population DataTable 1. Evolution of the population of Khalkhal 1966-2006.
KHALKHAL ii. Basic Population DataTable 2. Administration division of the former šahrestân of Khalkhal in 1998.
KHANLARI, PARVIZFigure 1. Photograph of Parviz Natel Khanlari.
KHANLARI, PARVIZFigure 2. Book cover of Qāfela-sālār-e Soḵan: majmuʿa-ye maqālāt darbāra-ye Ḵānlari.
KHANLARI, PARVIZFigure 3. Book cover of Soḵanvāra.
KHANLARI, PARVIZFigure 4. Book cover of Samak-e ʿayyār.
KHANLARI, PARVIZFigure 5. Book cover of Haftād soḵan, vol. I.
KHANSARI, MOHAMMADFigure 1. Photograph of Mohammad Khansari.
KHANSARI, MOHAMMADFigure 2. Book cover of Mohammad Khansari, Manṭeq-e ṣuri.
KHANSARI, MOHAMMADFigure 3. Book cover of Mohammad Khansari, Farhang-e eṣṭelāḥāt-e manṭeqi.
KHANSARI, MOHAMMADFigure 4. Book cover Mohammad Khansari, Isāḡuji.
KHANSARI, MOHAMMADFigure 5. Grave of Mohammad Khansari in Behešt-e Zahrā Cemetery, Tehran (Bahāri, 2010, p. 126).
KHAYYAM, OMAR vi. Illustrations of English TranslationsFigure 1. Miniature by Behzād, claimed as one of the first illustrations of the Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam. The miniature is contained in a manuscript dating from around 1500, published in facsimile by the Indian scholar Mafuz ul-Haq in 1939.
KHAYYAM, OMAR vi. Illustrations of English TranslationsFigure 2. Illustration by Elihu Vedder (1836-1923), attached to quatrain 43 in FitzGerald’s third edition, published by Houghton Mifflin in 1884.
KHAYYAM, OMAR vi. Illustrations of English TranslationsFigure 3. Illustration by Gilbert James (fl. 1895-1926) for quatrain 13 in FitzGerald’s first edition, published by Leonard Smithers in 1898.
KHAYYAM, OMAR vi. Illustrations of English TranslationsFigure 4. History of publication of illustrated editions of the Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam from 1859 (date of FitzGerald’s first edition) to 2004. The figures cover illustrated editions by all translators and in all languages so far identified. They include new editions and reprints of earlier illustrated versions, where known; the number of reprints is believed to be underestimated.
KHAYYAM, OMAR vi. Illustrations of English TranslationsFigure 5. Illustration by Edmund Dulac (1882-1953) for quatrain 12 in FitzGerald’s second edition, published by Hodder and Stoughton in 1909.
KHAYYAM, OMAR vi. Illustrations of English TranslationsFigure 6. Illustration by Andrew Peno (dates unknown) for quatrain 18 in FitzGerald’s first edition, published by Grange Books in 2001
KHAYYAM, OMAR vi. Illustrations of English TranslationsFigure 7. Illustration by Hojat Shakiba (born 1949), published in a multi lingual edition by Gooya House in Tehran in 1999. The illustration is not related to a specific quatrain, but based on the actual tomb of Khayyam in Nishapur.
KHAYYAM, OMAR vi. Illustrations of English TranslationsFigure 8. Illustration by Doris M Palmer for quatrain 20 in FitzGerald’s first edition, published by Leopold B Hill in 1921.
KHAYYAM, OMAR vi. Illustrations of English TranslationsFigure 9. Illustration by M Karpuzas (dates unknown), published in a multi lingual edition by Sharq in Tashkent in 1997. The illustration is not related to a specific quatrain.
KHAYYAM, OMAR ix. Translations into ItalianFigure 1. Frontispiece in Diego Angeli, Edward Fitzgerald: Quartine di Omar Khayyám, Versione di Diego Angeli, Bergamo, n.d., reproducing one of Elihu Vedder's illustrations for the journal Il Convito. It depicts FitzGerald’s quatrain 76 (in the 2nd edition) "The Moving Finger writes …".
KHAYYAM, OMAR xiii . Musical Works Based on the RubaiyatFigure 1. Cover for CD of the Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam with recitation and singing in Persian, from Mahoor Institute of Culture and Art, 2005. The recording was originally made in the 1970’s.
KHAYYAM, OMAR xiii . Musical Works Based on the RubaiyatFigure 2. Cover of the score for Liza Lehmann’s 1896 song cycle ‘In a Persian Garden’ (Designed for American edition, G Shirmer, 1898). Illustration courtesy of Jos Coumans.
KHAYYAM, OMAR xiii . Musical Works Based on the RubaiyatFigure 3. Granville Bantock (frontispiece of G. Bantock, ed., One Hundred Folksongs of all Nations, Boston, 1911).
KHAYYAM, OMAR xiii . Musical Works Based on the RubaiyatFigure 4. First page of vocal score for Sir Granville Bantock’s oratorio ‘Omar Khayyam’ (W. Breitkopf & Hartel, 1906).
KHAYYAM, OMAR xiii . Musical Works Based on the RubaiyatFigure 5. Cover for CD of ‘The Rubaiyat of Dorothy Ashby’ from Dusty Grove America Inc, 2007. Recording was originally issued in 1970. Cover shows Japanese koto which is among the instruments included in this setting of FitzGerald’s Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam.
KHAYYAM, OMAR xv. As MathematicianFigure 1. Diagram for Khayyam’s proof of the third proposition.
KHAYYAM, OMAR xv. As MathematicianFigure 2. Illustration of anthyphairesis.
KHAYYAM, OMAR xv. As MathematicianFigure 3. Illustration of anthyphairetic definition of same ratio.
KHAYYAM, OMAR xv. As MathematicianFigure 4. Diagram for Khayyam’s untitled essay on the division of the quadrant on the circle.
KHAYYAM, OMAR xv. As MathematicianFigure 5. Diagram for Māhāni’s solution to Archimedes’ lemma.
KHAYYAM, OMAR xv. As MathematicianFigure 6. Diagram for Khayyam’s treatise on algebra: extracting the square root.
KHAYYAM, OMAR xv. As MathematicianFigure 7. Diagram for Khayyam’s third solution for the square root.
KHAYYAM, OMAR xv. As MathematicianFigure 8. Diagram for Khayyam’s construction of a cube.
KHAYYAM, OMAR xv. As MathematicianFigure 9. Diagram 1 for Khayyam’s solution of cubic equations.
KHAYYAM, OMAR xv. As MathematicianFigure 10. Diagram 2 for Khayyam’s solution of cubic equations.
KIĀ, ṢĀDEQFigure 1. Photograph of Ṣādeq Kia (after ʿA. Bahrāmi, ed., Arj-nāma-ye Ṣādeq-e Kiā, Tehran, 2008, dust jacket).
KING OF THE BENIGHTEDFigure 1. Book cover, King of the Benighted
KIRSTE, JOHANN FERDINAND OTTOFigure 1. Johann and Anna Kirste, wedding photograph, 28 July 1888. Courtesy of Daniel Kirste.
ḴODĀYDĀDZĀDA, BĀBĀ-YUNOSFigure 1. Bābā-Yunos Ḵodāydādzāda. (Source: Braginskiĭ et al., p. 681).
KOJUR i. Historical GeographyTable 1. Subdivisions of Kojur.
KOJUR i. Historical GeographyFigure 1. Map of the rural districts (dehestāns) of the Ḥuma district (baḵš) of Nowšahr sub-province (šahrestān). The Ḥuma district corresponds to the historical Kojur. The map was composed by Habib Borjian from the data in MAI, 1969.
KONOW, STENFigure 1. Sten Konow.
KÖROĞLU i. Literary TraditionFigure 1. Tony Johannot (1803-1842), “Kourroglou,” after G. Sand, 1853, p. 1. Courtesy of Butler Library, Columbia University in the City of New York.
KÖROĞLU ii. Performance AspectsFigure 1. “Kuroḡli va qahramānlār,” after Kolliāt-e dāstān-e Kuroḡli, p. 136. Courtesy of Butler Library, Columbia University in the City of New York.
ḴOSROW I iii. CoinageFigure 1. Coinage of Ḵosrow I.
KŘIKAVOVÁ, ADÉLAFigure 1. Adéla Křikavová.
KUHPAYA i. The DistrictFigure 1. Kupā, Friday mosque, dome. (Photograph by the author, 2011).
KUHPAYA i. The DistrictFigure 2. Kupa's Friday mosque, a corner of the square structure supporting the dome. (Photograph by the author, 2011).
KUHPAYA i. The DistrictFigure 3. Kupa's Friday mosque, mehrāb. (Photograph by the author, 2011).
KUHPAYA i. The DistrictFigure 4. The Abbasid caravansary of Kupa,. courtyard. (Photograph by the author, 2011).
KUHPAYA i. The DistrictFigure 5. The Abbasid caravansary of Kupa, detail. (Photograph by the author, 2011).
KUHPAYA i. The DistrictFigure 6. Kupā. Ābanbār-e Bāḡčaḵān, a Safavid cistern, with an old mud wall in the background. (Photograph by the author, 2011).
KULABFigure 1. Kulab Teacher Training College, March 2007. (Courtesy of Maryam Borjian).
KULABFigure 2. Mausoleum of Mir Sayyed ʿAli Hamadāni in Kulab, March 2007. (Courtesy of Maryam Borjian).
KULABFigure 3. Modern fortress around Holbok/Hulbuk archeological excavation site, March 2007. (Courtesy of Maryam Borjian).
KUSTĪGFigure 1. A kustīg woven in Kerman, 2003. (Photograph courtesy of J. K. Choksy).
KUSTĪGFigure 2. Mrs. Najamai M. Kotwal weaving a kustīg, Mumbai, 1990. (Photograph courtesy of F. M. Kotwal).
KUSTĪGFigure 3. Ritual of “tieing the holy cord” (kustī bastan), Mumbai, 1984. (Photograph courtesy of J. K. Choksy).

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